Tell U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Maritime Administration: No Sea Port Oil Terminal!

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Your message will be delivered to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD):

I’m writing to urge the Army Corps to deny permits for the Enterprise Project Partners Sea Port Oil Terminal (SPOT), as well as to express opposition to SPOT Terminal Services LLC’s application for a Deepwater Port License from the Maritime Administration, with respect to significant inadequacies in the project’s environmental review process (DEIS).

An oil spill at any point along the 168-mile pipeline project would cause irreparable harm to fragile wetlands and rivers, and out into the Gulf waters. The risk to our Gulf communities and ecosystems is too great, while all the benefit goes to private companies and their investors — let alone the disastrous impact this project would pose to our climate. At a rate of transporting 2 million barrels per day, the project would enable increased oil production at a time when we need to be phasing out existing production of fossil fuels and transitioning toward renewable energy sources.

More specifically, the project’s environmental review (EIS) does not consider the very real and foreseeable direct and indirect impacts of the project’s greenhouse gas emissions on climate change. It is widely understood that crude exports are driving the rapid increase of oil and gas drilling in the Permian Basin, oil that could otherwise be left in the ground. The U.S. Maritime Administration must analyze the full lifecycle climate impacts of oil drilling, transportation, refining, and consumption that would result from this project.

Given all of these impacts and inadequacies, I urge MARAD to deny the Deepwater Port License Application for the Sea Port Oil Terminal, and urge the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to deny the permit for the Enterprise Project Partners Sea Port Oil Terminal (SPOT) as described by section 404 of the Clean Water Act. The project is not in the national interest and imposes too many risks and burdens on our Gulf Coast communities and ecosystems.

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    The fossil fuel industry wants to build a massive crude oil storage facility, offshore pipeline, and export terminal off the coast of Freeport TX. The project, known as the Sea Port Oil Terminal, would load Very Large Crude Carriers (VLCCs) — massive oil tankers — at a rate of 2 million barrels per day. It would be the first terminal of its kind in the U.S., and would cut the cost of exporting U.S. crude oil.

    The project still requires a key federal water permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and approval from the Maritime Administration (MARAD) for a draft environmental impact statement. 

    In a stunning development, the Surfside Beach City Council recently voted unanimously to oppose the terminal. Then just last week, the mayor of neighboring city Oyster Creek vowed to do "everything in his power" to delay the project. These are nearly unprecedented steps for local governments to take along the Gulf Coast and we need to back it up.

    An oil spill at any point along the 168-mile pipeline project would cause irreparable harm to fragile wetlands, rivers, and out into the Gulf waters. The risk to our Gulf communities and ecosystems is too great, while all the benefit goes to private companies and their investors. Let alone the disastrous impact this project would pose to our climate, as it enables increased oil production at a time when we need to be phasing out existing production of fossil fuels and transitioning toward renewable energy sources.

    Help us build momentum and join local communities in saying: No Sea Port Oil Terminal!